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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just browsing through the web doing some research and came across this article just outlining some specifications, comparisons, and thoughts on the SCR950. Going through how Yamaha took some notes from the 1960's and revamped it to be used today. Worth a quick look through :wink2:

1. The 2017 Yamaha SCR950 is based on the Yamaha Star Bolt C-Spec. Starting with the same frame and motor as the Yamaha Star Bolt C-Spec, Yamaha has turned the successful cruiser into a modern scrambler via just a few wisely chosen modifications.

2. The SCR950 is fifth bike in the new Yamaha Sport Heritage line. It joins the SR400, Star Bolt C-Spec, XSR900 and VMax as Yamaha’s entries into the sporting market, but with a retro twist.

3. With adventure-ready Bridgestone Trail Wing tires, Yamaha insists the SCR950 is truly ready for rides down unpaved roads. In a tip o’ the cap to the scramblers of the 1960s, Yamaha has taken a purely street bike—the Star Bolt C-Spec—and made it into a do-everything scrambler that still retains much of its street character. The wheels are also dirt-friendly—19” front and 17” rear, and use wire spokes.

4. The SCR950’s suspension parts are the same, but use different settings. To make the SCR work as a scrambler, the conventional forks and piggyback-reservoir shocks are revalved to sporting specs, and the new subframe allows added clearance for the rear fender. Front suspension travel is 4.7 inches, while the rear wheel travel remains limited to 2.8 inches.

2017 Yamaha SCR950 Scrambler parts5. In scrambler tradition, the 2017 Yamaha SCR950’s exhaust does not run under the motor. Although not the upswept pipes usually found on 1960s scramblers, the exhaust on the SCR950 does run above the lower frame rails and tucks between the engine cases and the right footpeg and brake pedal.

6. Ergonomics are sporty, and dirt-capable. The SCR950’s taller, long, flat dual seat is both functional and period-correct, while the crossbar-equipped bars are wide for good leverage. Although the footpegs are in the same spot on the frame as on the Bolt C-Spec, their relationship to the bars and seat changes significantly. For comparison, the SCR950’s seat height is 32.7 inches, while the Bolt C-Spec’s is 30.1 inches.

7. For all the changes, the 2017 Yamaha SCR950 is still a Bolt at heart. With a rake of 28.4 degrees and tipping the scales at 547 pounds, ready to ride, along with the limited 2.8 inches of rear wheel travel, the amount of off-road duty should be pretty limited. However, its potential as a fun sport bike, with the impressive 942cc air-cooled V-twin, is definitely there. It won’t be close to the XSR900 triple, but it should easily best the SR400 single.

8. Yamaha is offering plenty of accessories for personalization. Options include a number-plate flyscreen, a small windscreen, steel skidplate, beefier footpegs, and side bags.

9. Does the 2017 Yamaha SCR950 replace the Star Bolt C-Spec? Maybe. Yamaha also showed us the lightly updated 2017 Star Bolt and Bolt R-Spec (they get the new flange-free fuel tank found on the SCR), but not a C-Spec—at least not yet.

10. You can get the 2017 Yamaha SCR950 in July 2016 at Yamaha dealers. If you’re interested, you don’t have long to wait. Available in Charcoal Silver or Rapid Red, the list price is $8,699.
 

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I assume the Bridgestone Trail Wing tires are both tubed because I think the front is the TW101 with the TW152 in the rear. TW12 and TW9 would be better for off roading but then again, the scr950 is not off road specific.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I don't really plan to do anything too "rugged" with it so I'm not going to take up any time or efforts to do anything about that. I'm sure it'll be sufficient
 

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No doubt and lucky for us being on two wheels that have a small footprint we can slow down enough to swerve around to where the speed bump is non existent, typically its wide enough for a typical car tire to get through, for bikes it's a breeze.


 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Definitely love those types where there's a good amount of room on either side. Even the ones that have the opening down the center are pretty sweet too. But then you go to some places and it feels like this:

 

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The least they should be able to clear is a decent sized speed bump. If they didn't clear the speed bumps, I'm sure there would be quite a few upset customers...
Just ask the 1st few years' FZ-09 owners that hit the oil pan drain going over small bumps, R/R tracks, etc...
There's a Y-shaped fin in front of the drain plug that was supposed to protect the plug from hard strikes. Thing is, the fin had nothing more than thin, cast pan metal holding it in place while the drain bolt was secured in material many times thicker.
I took a hacksaw blade and cut the fin on my FZ-09 down nearly flush with the pan and then installed a low-profile drain bolt before I had an "oops".
Yamaha finally listened and moved the drain to the front side of the pan along the vertical edge so it isn't sticking down any more.
The FZ-07's drain bolt is in a similar position, but for some reason looks awfully vulnerable to me. Review photos showed a FZ-07 cornering hard to the left and the drain bolt was only a few inches off the pavement and the first thing to hit if the suspension were to bottom out over a mid-corner bump. Nothing like running through a puddle of your own oil while cranked over in a turn to lend excitement to one's day!!
I'm glad the SCR doesn't have this worry.
 

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So that's why people were always installing a belly pan onto their FZ-09, in order to protect the drain bolt and not leave a trail of destruction. The scr950's belly is pretty flat and protected by the frame, but a bash plate is still a good idea.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I can't help but think about how many people got screwed by that and had some substantial issues. Was Yamaha covering the costs of people that did damage them though ?
 

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I would need one regardless. Passing by construction sites on my bike odds are there's a lot of stuff the tires are kicking up that I don't know about. Thankfully with belly pans if you get them in black, even rattle canning in black will do you a lot of good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
And the best part about rattle canning them black, you can always go back and do it again very easily and it's cheap! I would be really worried about nails and crud puncturing your tires in those situations though
 
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