Yamaha SCR950 Forum banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning on installing a GPS (not permanently) to my bike, for longer day cruises. Is there a good spot for splicing into a switched power source? I'm not getting a high-end big buck unit, just an inexpensive used Garmin car GPS from ebay (Nuvi 1490T). Lots of back roads here in N.E. that I plan to explore, especially in the New Hampshire, Vermont areas. I figure a GPS will help me get home from wherever I get lost at. Thanks


Lee
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
I'm planning on installing a GPS (not permanently) to my bike, for longer day cruises. Is there a good spot for splicing into a switched power source? I'm not getting a high-end big buck unit, just an inexpensive used Garmin car GPS from ebay (Nuvi 1490T). Lots of back roads here in N.E. that I plan to explore, especially in the New Hampshire, Vermont areas. I figure a GPS will help me get home from wherever I get lost at. Thanks


Lee
I wanted a power connection for the exact same reason of occasional GPS use. I know you are asking about a switched power source, but I simply bought this USB adapter that plugs into the pigtail for my Battery Tender. I use Google Maps on my phone which allows me to just clip my phone to the custom handcrafted leather crossbar bag I obtained from @Krixtoph. It works great for my purposes and the belt clip on my phone case keeps it securely hooked to the loop on the bag.
 

Attachments

  • Like
Reactions: Krixtoph

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
The relatively low draw of a GPS would make tapping in directly to a switched (+) fairly safe.
The (+) to the tag light is easy enough to identify.
If you planned on using the 12V outlet for something else or maybe adding
accessory lights later, bringing a relay to the party could help.
That way the electrical "strain" would remain low and you'd have a robust switch to carry the current load without risking an existing bike component.
Relays are common auto parts store items, though a waterproof one might be a bit more expensive.
Tucked under the seat somewhere, even an ordinary one would give good service.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks, Gents. Good ideas from both. I've used auto type relays for many things in my past hotrod builds. They are especially useful when upgrading to a heavy load component, such as lighting or electric fans
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Deciding not to hardwire an outlet, I followed Schu's suggestion of installing a battery tender pigtail (thank you, sir), and a lighter socket that could be plugged into the pigtail for my GPS. Tomorrow's temp. is supposed to be in the upper 50's here in CT, so I'm going to venture out on my FIRST ride !! It's been almost 28 yrs. since I last rode, and I'm getting anxious to ride again. It's time to see how these 71 year old bones react! It'll also give me a chance to calibrate the KOSO for mph, and also set the shift position indicater
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
It's been almost 28 yrs. since I last rode, and I'm getting anxious to ride again. It's time to see how these 71 year old bones react!
Hey Lee, we’re the same age! So beware the heavy SCR that becomes tippy as it slows to stall speed, especially if you haven’t ridden for a while.

I found out the hard way my senior reflexes needed tuning up with more practice away from traffic to get my feet coordinated with braking while shifting to neutral, then quickly planted for a stable stop.

This basic skill required more careful planning after switching back to the Bolt from a lightweight 200 cc machine. Fortunately it's become a routine reflex again.

Cheers, RR
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
61 Posts
Hey Lee, we’re the same age! So beware the heavy SCR that becomes tippy as it slows to stall speed, especially if you haven’t ridden for a while.

I found out the hard way my senior reflexes needed tuning up with more practice away from traffic to get my feet coordinated with braking while shifting to neutral, then quickly planted for a stable stop.

This basic skill required more careful planning after switching back to the Bolt from a lightweight 200 cc machine. Fortunately it's become a routine reflex again.

Cheers, RR

Also a returning rider at 71 (almost 72) with an SCR. It was 45 years from my last ride (Yamaha 360 Enduro) and this new thing is SOOOO much heavier than all my previous bikes (this is number 8). Prior to this, my heaviest was a Triumph T100C I had back in 1967, and I believe it weighed in at around 325 lbs. Probably an easier adjustment today for those of us who haven't ridden in years since we can reboot our muscle memory rather than retrain it. The most difficult adjustment I have now is when I ride my mountain bike (28 lbs and I feel like I'm heading over the bars after getting used to the more laid back seating of the SCR). Same basic concept, though, keep the rubber side down whenever possible.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,238 Posts
Deciding not to hardwire an outlet, I followed Schu's suggestion of installing a battery tender pigtail (thank you, sir), and a lighter socket that could be plugged into the pigtail for my GPS. Tomorrow's temp. is supposed to be in the upper 50's here in CT, so I'm going to venture out on my FIRST ride !! It's been almost 28 yrs. since I last rode, and I'm getting anxious to ride again. It's time to see how these 71 year old bones react! It'll also give me a chance to calibrate the KOSO for mph, and also set the shift position indicater
Enjoy!

The shift position indicator on the Koso takes almost no time to calibrate. At least, mine didn’t, and I’ve never been able to fool it yet. I was like ”is that it”??

In fact, that reminds of a funny story about what a girl I once spent the night with said to me.......never mind - another time, maybe! :grin2:
Ben
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the reassurances, guys. Yeah, my last ride was a Honda XR200, which, I think was almost 1/3 the weight of the SCR. Having bought the bike from a dealership 2 states away, I didn't get a chance to ride it before purchase. They delivered it to me, and when we took it off the trailer, it was the first time I realized just how heavy this thing is. Not complaining though. The bike just reminds me of another time and another place, and I really like it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
Thanks for the reassurances, guys. Yeah, my last ride was a Honda XR200, which, I think was almost 1/3 the weight of the SCR. Having bought the bike from a dealership 2 states away, I didn't get a chance to ride it before purchase. They delivered it to me, and when we took it off the trailer, it was the first time I realized just how heavy this thing is. Not complaining though. The bike just reminds me of another time and another place, and I really like it.
You'll get used to it in time.
I had a GL1800 and a KLR650 at the same time. It was fun to switch back and forth and feel the near 500lb weight difference!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,208 Posts
Thanks for the reassurances, guys. Yeah, my last ride was a Honda XR200, which, I think was almost 1/3 the weight of the SCR. Having bought the bike from a dealership 2 states away, I didn't get a chance to ride it before purchase. They delivered it to me, and when we took it off the trailer, it was the first time I realized just how heavy this thing is. Not complaining though. The bike just reminds me of another time and another place, and I really like it.
You will quickly become acclimated to the top heaviness of your SCR. Just don't let your pant leg get hung up on anything as you reach for solid ground at a stop light....... I recovered in time, but it had to be amusing for the car behind me as I was flailing my left leg like it was on fire. I always drop my left foot and leave my right on the peg. So the bike was going left out of habit, and my left got hung up.

I too had an XR200 while my two boys were learning to ride on their own little mini's. That XR200 was the best tight woods bike I've ever owned. You could throw that thing between the trees and easily keep pace with bigger and badder bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Schu, you are so right. That XR200 was the best woods bike I ever had! Light and nimble and plenty of low speed torque for tight trail riding


Anyways, just got back from my first outing. 30 miles!! Got the speedo set at 67%, down from the initial 98%. It follows the GPS pretty closely. Am having an issue with the gear select function, but that is most likely operator error (I hope). The speedo still knows where neutral is, which is the main concern. I LIKE IT !! :grin2::grin2::grin2:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
441 Posts
Here's my solution for USB power.



Simple little switchable USB power source from eBay, wired to a fuse and then to the battery.

Charles.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top