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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wondering because those Bridgestone knobby tires are said to be limiting on paved roads, maybe not so much packed dirt ones.

Which wheels will you get?
 

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Hm... didn't think about that. I probably won't ever be on a dirt road that would put those knobby tires to use...
 

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I've pushed the stock tires as far as ground clearance will allow and they've done admirably.
That said, for the mostly street riding I'll be doing on this bike, I am looking into a set of Michelin Anakee IIIs come replacement time.
I have a set on the Super Tenere now and they've lasted a loooong time while doing fantastic on the road and even some limited off-road riding.
I ride the crap out of the heavy Tenere and still got 11k miles + out of the last front Anakee and expect the current one to match it.
The last rear tire went almost as long.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Took a look at the Michelin Anakee III and they seem to be great tires, if they're good enough for the GS Adventure then it's good enough for the scr950. How does it handle wet pavement?
 

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Took a look at the Michelin Anakee III and they seem to be great tires, if they're good enough for the GS Adventure then it's good enough for the scr950. How does it handle wet pavement?
Michelin's noted for making good rain tires and the Anakee IIIs are no exception. The Super Tenere has TC/ABS and I can't recall either kicking in while riding in the rain.

Here are pictures I took just now.
The rear tire has a good bit of tread left at about 6,000 miles. (1st & 3rd photos) The front's in need of replacement soon. It's got almost 10k hard miles on it and still handles just fine.
 

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Those tires actually looks as good as new even after 6,000 miles of wear. Plenty of life still left in them and they look evenly worn.

Admittedly, I do a lot of straight riding on pavement so my chicken strips are pretty juicy. Maybe I'll give the Anakee IIIs a try after the stock set has worn down.
 

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what i can tell from those tires... not enough leaning :D
The hard parts start to drag right as the rear tire reaches the edge. The front is too rounded to be rid of the chicken strips.
Sorta like my old GL1800 at Deal's Gap. It dragged everything. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Best not to lean that far if the hard parts starts dragging.
Join the chicken strip club! Strips so juicy Colonel Sanders wants them back.
 

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The Michelin Commander II tires seems pretty good too and they're supposed to last up to 25,000 miles. Not bad if durability is what you're looking for.
 

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Also when you factor in riding habits it can get you even more mileage out of those tires. I have a feeling a lot of these will be in the city so given how we should be riding, these tires will be up to much abuse.
 

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The Michelin Commander II tires seems pretty good too and they're supposed to last up to 25,000 miles. Not bad if durability is what you're looking for.
We put a set of Commander IIs on my girlfriend's V-Star 950 and they seem to be wearing fine. Less than the stock Dunlops and she says they ride much better, too.
I just replaced the front Michelin Anakee III on the Super Tenere before a short weekend trip and the old one still had some life left at 10k miles.
The trick to buying a long-lasting tire is to ride enough to use it up before it starts to age and harden. It doesn't take as long as one might think, either. We had customers bring in tires to be mounted that'd been bought online with build dates of 2 or more years and they felt noticeably harder/less resilient than a set of "fresh" tires.
It might wear just as long, but it won't offer the same grip.

You pays yer' money, you takes yer' chances, as they say.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Old tires are ok for short trips and not over 80mph, but I wouldn't use them if I plan to play and see excessive speeds. Long touring rider or speeding down highways at 100mph would require a set that's not so old. I've been on a 3 year old bike still with stock tires and it was fine but that was only on city roads.
 

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And here I was thinking Kenda Big Blocks for my next set of tires, and I rarely ride off-road. I just love the look...

Charles.
 

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I swapped out for Bridgestone Battlewings for a long road trip. I’ve been amazed with how sticky they are on pavement. Once they have some heat in them their basically impossible to out ride on the SCR.
And they’ve taken quite a beating on gravel/dirt fire roads with no complaints.
Once I get done with my road trip I was thinking about putting Continental TKC 80’s on just because I love the look so much.
I would really love to find some flat track type tires but am having a hard time finding anything that will fit?
Had anyone seen and flat track tires in the right sizes??
Let me know.
Thanks!
 

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Put the new Michelin Anakee IIIs to the rain test this morning on the ride home. It was POURING and I never felt the bike slip, slide or otherwise break traction.
I once actually leaned on the brakes a bit more firmly than I might have otherwise and all the bike did was stop. I'm a happy camper!
 

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Put the new Michelin Anakee IIIs to the rain test this morning on the ride home. It was POURING and I never felt the bike slip, slide or otherwise break traction.
I once actually leaned on the brakes a bit more firmly than I might have otherwise and all the bike did was stop. I'm a happy camper!
Eddie, I concur, I had a set of these on my GS and ran them thru the rain, gravel, dirt, mud and even snow! A very good all purpose tire.
 

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The trick to buying a long-lasting tire is to ride enough to use it up before it starts to age and harden. It doesn't take as long as one might think, either. We had customers bring in tires to be mounted that'd been bought online with build dates of 2 or more years and they felt noticeably harder/less resilient than a set of "fresh" tires.
It might wear just as long, but it won't offer the same grip.

You pays yer' money, you takes yer' chances, as they say.
Good Comment Eddie.
 
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