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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2012 Super Tenere 1200 that I bought new. Since then, it's "eaten" three Yuasa YTZ12S batteries. Now, I've never had any battery go bad this quickly before. The last bike I kept this long and as many miles was a 2002 Suzuki DL1000. It had one replacement battery in 6 years & 36k miles.
I began to wonder if it's simply a packaging thing. The 12A battery is the biggest Yamaha could fit in the given space and price point.
It's just too small, I think.
Even our littler 950 twins use a 14A battery.

I called my Yamaha dealer and asked what he had in his 2013 Super Tenere: "A GYZ16H." It's the same width and depth as the YTZ12S, but taller. A LOT taller.
Turns out "Scot" cut his battery box up to fit the bigger part. That's an expensive "oops" if it didn't work. Or is it? The battery tray that holds the fuses, ECM, battery, relays and even the tool kit is just $40. Cool!
Out came my aircraft snips and MacGyver knife. =)
With an oil bottle cut up/open to make a new box "end", I now have 240CCA goodness in place of the 210CCA stock battery.

:grin2:
 

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I have a 2012 Super Tenere 1200 that I bought new. Since then, it's "eaten" three Yuasa YTZ12S batteries. Now, I've never had any battery go bad this quickly before. The last bike I kept this long and as many miles was a 2002 Suzuki DL1000. It had one replacement battery in 6 years & 36k miles.
I began to wonder if it's simply a packaging thing. The 12A battery is the biggest Yamaha could fit in the given space and price point.
It's just too small, I think.
Even our littler 950 twins use a 14A battery.

I called my Yamaha dealer and asked what he had in his 2013 Super Tenere: "A GYZ16H." It's the same width and depth as the YTZ12S, but taller. A LOT taller.
Turns out "Scot" cut his battery box up to fit the bigger part. That's an expensive "oops" if it didn't work. Or is it? The battery tray that holds the fuses, ECM, battery, relays and even the tool kit is just $40. Cool!
Out came my aircraft snips and MacGyver knife. =)
With an oil bottle cut up/open to make a new box "end", I now have 240CCA goodness in place of the 210CCA stock battery.

:grin2:
Looking for a smaller battery with more CCA, didn’t you consider one of those new-fangled Lithium-ion batteries? Was considering getting one for my Harley (before I sold it! :grin2: )
Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looking for a smaller battery with more CCA, didn’t you consider one of those new-fangled Lithium-ion batteries? Was considering getting one for my Harley (before I sold it! :grin2: )
Ben
I tried a Speed Cell lithium battery in the ST for about 3 weeks. Then the temperature went below 60F and the cranking got slower & slower.
I called and their tech said I'd have to remove the battery and keep it on a charger if I wasn't going to ride the bike for a few days (even when it was warm out!). That's one purchase I regretted.
I was tempted to fit an EarthX this time, but lucked into the 16A Yuasa for about 1/3 the cost. The EarthX does well in cold. Thing is, I live in Georgia where it can top 120F under my outside bike cover. So, I'd be going from one extreme to the other. If I have to replace something every 2-3 years due to conditions, let it be the least expensive of the two.
 

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I tried a Speed Cell lithium battery in the ST for about 3 weeks. Then the temperature went below 60F and the cranking got slower & slower.
I called and their tech said I'd have to remove the battery and keep it on a charger if I wasn't going to ride the bike for a few days (even when it was warm out!). That's one purchase I regretted.
I was tempted to fit an EarthX this time, but lucked into the 16A Yuasa for about 1/3 the cost. The EarthX does well in cold. Thing is, I live in Georgia where it can top 120F under my outside bike cover. So, I'd be going from one extreme to the other. If I have to replace something every 2-3 years due to conditions, let it be the least expensive of the two.
That’s interesting ‘advice’ you got, cos the research I did when I was intending to buy one specified they were a better buy for the occasional rider, given their ability to hold charge for longer. There was the little idiosyncrasy that you had to ‘wake’ the battery in cold weather first, by having the headlight/accessories on for a minute or so beforehand. No idea how they are supposed to perform in such extreme heat tho - not usually a problem here!!! :grin2:
Ben
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That’s interesting ‘advice’ you got, cos the research I did when I was intending to buy one specified they were a better buy for the occasional rider, given their ability to hold charge for longer. There was the little idiosyncrasy that you had to ‘wake’ the battery in cold weather first, by having the headlight/accessories on for a minute or so beforehand. No idea how they are supposed to perform in such extreme heat tho - not usually a problem here!!! :grin2:
Ben
In response to the battery lacking power to crank the bike over readily, the Speedcell technician asked me over and over if I had an alarm or other accessory that would put a drain on the battery when parked. I kept telling her "No." The only drain was the clock in the dash. "Is it an add-on?", she asked. I told her, "No! It's the LCD clock that is made into the bike and the display only comes on when the bike's running or you press a button on the instrument cluster."
Other lithium batteries seem to get high marks from customers who leave them parked for extended periods. I lucked out and bought the one intended for someone's track bike that lived on a charger all the time, apparently.
 
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