Yamaha SCR950 Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Check this out. Baron Raise Up kit for the 950 Bolt. It should fit the SCR950 as well. Bolt this on and slide the tubes down in the trees 1/2" (top of the nut flush with the triple tree top), and you'll get a significant increase in ride height. It won't be as big a step as the 12.25" shocks I have, but it will still be quite reasonable, at a far cheaper cost and without all the extra work I had to do. You'll have to re-tension the belt afterwards, that's it.

https://sscustomcycle.com/product/baron-custom-rear-suspension-raise-up-kit-for-2014-bolt/



Charles.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Has anybody tried this raise up kit? SSCustom says they dont have the fitment for the SCR950.They are playing safe I believe.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
Has anybody tried this raise up kit? SSCustom says they dont have the fitment for the SCR950.They are playing safe I believe.
It sure looks like it would work and being based on the Bolt, I don't know why it wouldn't. Visit your local Yamaha dealer and take a few pics of a Bolt and compare. If you are a gambler, give it a try. If it doesn't fit, which is highly unlikely, send it back. You're only out the shipping. Keep us posted! Jevers
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
884 Posts
I got to wondering about changing the ride height based upon the shock length or changing the mounting points.
What happens to belt tension?
It appears that the static tension prescribed by Yamaha is set unladen with the swingarm in a position slightly lower than a straight line drawn through the
countershaft pulley, swingarm pivot and rear axle center. With a rider on board, the swing arm moves toward level, increasing belt tension somewhat due to the farthest point of
the rear pulley moving away from the other two points (photo). Past level, the belt loosens ever so slightly. This cycles countless times on a ride.

If the bike height is raised with longer shocks or different mounts, the swingarm would have an even lower starting point and thus require the belt be tightened more to achieve the recommended tension.
That would also mean the amount of tension would increase more than before as the swingarm travels through the level position while riding, yes?
Belt tension is much more critical than chain tension in order to prevent ratcheting of the belt teeth on the pulleys.
A chain run slack simply wears the sprocket teeth more rapidly and generally doesn't slip.
Thoughts?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,180 Posts
I got to wondering about changing the ride height based upon the shock length or changing the mounting points.
What happens to belt tension?
It appears that the static tension prescribed by Yamaha is set unladen with the swingarm in a position slightly lower than a straight line drawn through the
countershaft pulley, swingarm pivot and rear axle center. With a rider on board, the swing arm moves toward level, increasing belt tension somewhat due to the farthest point of
the rear pulley moving away from the other two points (photo). Past level, the belt loosens ever so slightly. This cycles countless times on a ride.

If the bike height is raised with longer shocks or different mounts, the swingarm would have an even lower starting point and thus require the belt be tightened more to achieve the recommended tension.
That would also mean the amount of tension would increase more than before as the swingarm travels through the level position while riding, yes?
Belt tension is much more critical than chain tension in order to prevent ratcheting of the belt teeth on the pulleys.
A chain run slack simply wears the sprocket teeth more rapidly and generally doesn't slip.
Thoughts?
You are correct. I believe repositioning the original shocks would be less detrimental than longer/extended travel of replacement shocks. Original shocks would maintain the same range of motion, but you will have changed the geometry as you explained so well. Probably less variation in center distance than if you swap shocks and increased your range of motion. I'm pretty sure Charles will give us his first hand experience on the effects of longer/extended travel replacements. You'd probably have to ride like this guy before you would really have any problems.
 
  • Like
Reactions: eddie

·
Registered
Joined
·
677 Posts
I got to wondering about changing the ride height based upon the shock length or changing the mounting points.
What happens to belt tension?
It appears that the static tension prescribed by Yamaha is set unladen with the swingarm in a position slightly lower than a straight line drawn through the
countershaft pulley, swingarm pivot and rear axle center. With a rider on board, the swing arm moves toward level, increasing belt tension somewhat due to the farthest point of
the rear pulley moving away from the other two points (photo). Past level, the belt loosens ever so slightly. This cycles countless times on a ride.

If the bike height is raised with longer shocks or different mounts, the swingarm would have an even lower starting point and thus require the belt be tightened more to achieve the recommended tension.
That would also mean the amount of tension would increase more than before as the swingarm travels through the level position while riding, yes?
Belt tension is much more critical than chain tension in order to prevent ratcheting of the belt teeth on the pulleys.
A chain run slack simply wears the sprocket teeth more rapidly and generally doesn't slip.
Thoughts?
You are correct. I believe repositioning the original shocks would be less detrimental than longer/extended travel of replacement shocks. Original shocks would maintain the same range of motion, but you will have changed the geometry as you explained so well. Probably less variation in center distance than if you swap shocks and increased your range of motion. I'm pretty sure Charles will give us his first hand experience on the effects of longer/extended travel replacements. You'd probably have to ride like this guy before you would really have any problems.
I concur. I liken the stock suspension to a certain sore Male appendage the day after his wedding night. You just don't screw with it! 😖
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
437 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So, what I did was this:

Step 1: adjust the belt tension to the spec.
Step 2: I removed the shocks and jacked up the swingarm to the point where the OEM shocks would be fully compressed. (It's easy to see how much travel the shock has, just measure the length of the chrome piston in the shock). Then, I measured the belt deflection at that point.
Step 3: I measured my longer shocks length and travel. So, after some calculation I moved the swingarm down to the place where the new shocks would be fully compressed. I adjusted the belt tension at this point to exactly match the tension found in step 2.
Step 4: Put the new shocks on and measure the tension. This is the new setting.

NOTE: Make sure not to rotate the wheel at ALL between measurements. This will completely invalidate the test. Make sure to adjust at the tightest point of the belt.

With my rather excessive lift, the deflection needs to be 9mm with the bike on the side stand. That's only 1mm out of spec (6-8mm stock), and I'm running 12.25" shocks with a little more travel than stock. With just a 1" rise-up kit on there, I don't think you'll even be out of spec at all.

Charles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
I have just done this to my SCR i had to take the muffler bolts to get the extra room to get the shock that side but it fits just fine. I definitely like the way this bike handles now and i haven't scraped since so I am happy!
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top