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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am an Englishman living in northern Thailand. I wanted an SCR when they came out but didn't have the correct visa to allow me to purchase a vehicle. Now I have, and the SCR is no longer manufactured. However, I have tracked a secondhand one down to a dealer 190 km south of me in Chiang Mai. I won't post the price as it's irrelevant to this discussion. Two things concern me about the SCR950: 1 the weight. At 248 kg is's not light; 2 the fact it runs on tubed tyres. Regarding the latter issue, I would imagine I could put a product in the inner tube such as Slime. It's supposed to stop punctures. As regards the former, I understand the weight is carried low. I am pretty strong. I may be 68, but I'm 6 feet and 90 kg/198 pounds and not overweight at all, so the weight shouldn't bother me [my last two bikes in Europe weighed 263 and 265 kg respectively], although it must affect the bike's nimbleness. The ground clearance issue doesn't bother me as I'll just be chugging around on tarmac.

I am attracted to the bike's fantastic engine, lack of electronics and iconic styling, although I hate the dash. I used to ride an XT500E, in fact I went to Portugal three times from England and Greece once on the XT, and the SCR reminds me of the equally iconic XT. I see the SCR as a bike I'll keep until I am too frail to ride it. Is the weight noticeable?
 

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The weight is noticeable on the SCR when you have to push it without power, because of it's height. Once it gets going, it's torquey as hell and extremely comfortable to ride for a tall rider like yourself. It's a good bike, with low clearance for adventures. Once you can get past that clearance problem and know your limitations, it will certainly be one of your favorites. A small modification or two really makes it sound even better and faster: airbox and computer flash.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I have had a good number of photos sent. It is actually a private sale, although the dealer acted as an intruduction. It has only done 4,243 kilometres, is red and looks immaculate. Totally standard, no accessories which is fine by me. I can see a long bus ride coming on. A trip down to Chiang Mai on my own suits me, too. The wife wont be too impressed. My other bike in Chiang Rai is a KTM 390 Duke.
 

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I don’t think that bike is totally standard with no accessories.

I see a scrub plate which may have been custom made as I have not seen one quite like it. It also has an aftermarket seat. But it looks great.
I would add that...

  • The rear view mirrors are missing.
  • The headlight bezel has been replaced or blacked out.
  • The gauge cluster bezel is either removed or blacked out.
 

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I would add that...

The headlight bezel has been replaced or blacked out.
The gauge cluster bezel is either removed or blacked out.
No, that just denotes the Euro/rest of the world (ie non-US) spec. The paint on the tank, and the side panels are slightly different, too (in fact, the same as mine!!!:) )
Black wheels, too (y)

Ben
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The bike was delivered this morning. It is actually a 2020 one. Looks fantastic. Now to source a rack. I'll do a search on this forum. Hepco & Becker do one. It should take a plate for a Givi 26-litre top case. I already have it on my KTM Duke 390. It's only very light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
My first short ride confirmed what I had read about the footpegs. They attack your calves when you have your feet down, and it is tricky getting your feet down to start with. I'm sure I will get used to these quirks. Great low-down torque.
 

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My first short ride confirmed what I had read about the footpegs. They attack your calves when you have your feet down, and it is tricky getting your feet down to start with. I'm sure I will get used to these quirks. Great low-down torque.
I swapped my foot pegs for Tenere pegs. The ones with the rubber insert but metal claws around the perimeter. The ends are more rounded and don't have the sharp bits sticking out on the end that tore up my calves. The location is still in the way when walking the bike, but collisions with my leg hurt less. For what it's worth, I read the same thing about the peg placement on the Royal Enfield Interceptor and when I tried it out, they were definitely in the same area. So were the Triumph Scrambler's when I tried that out. I think it's just a mid-mount control issue made a little worse by the Yamaha's sort of wide bottom end.

I've gotten used to it after a couple months but I still notice it from time to time. That said, it really only is noticeable when I'm trying to put the bike away. I now generally get off the bike and walk it backwards into the garage instead of trying to walk while seated on it.
Vehicle Automotive tire Wheel Automotive lighting Tire
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Just an update. I don't find the position of the foot pegs a problem now. I had a good ride today. Chiang Rai to Chiang Saen on the Mekong and back. Less than 140 km but enough to thoroughly feel at home on the bike. It has good torque, holds the road well and is roomy and comfortable. Very pleased with my purchase.
 

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Just an update. I don't find the position of the foot pegs a problem now. I had a good ride today. Chiang Rai to Chiang Saen on the Mekong and back. Less than 140 km but enough to thoroughly feel at home on the bike. It has good torque, holds the road well and is roomy and comfortable. Very pleased with my purchase.
I think you'll come to enjoy it much more the longer you ride it. My Corbin seat helps.lol
 
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