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Is there any adjustment possible for the shifter? I test rode an last week and had a hard time getting my toe under it (stock factory pegs). I was wondering if there is any linkage adjustment available to raise the tab slightly for a better fit.

Thanks
 

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There are two lock nuts located on the shift linkage rod. (green and red arrows in the photo)
Break both of them free a couple of turns and then turn the rod using the knurled wheel (Blue arrow) in the center to raise or lower the shifter.
Like the new location? Retighten the lock nuts being careful not to let the shaft rotate and mess up your setting.

Alternately and not quite as quick and simple:
Remove the front pulley cover and then the bolt holding the shifter attachment to the shaft coming out of the transmission.
Mark the original position of the shifter with a Sharpie pen or even a small punch mark on the shaft next to the "split" in the shifter attachment.
It may already have a punch mark. I'm not sure.
Next, remove the shifter from the shaft and put it back on a spline or two away from where it was and check your work. Adjust as needed.
All good? Reinstall and carefully tighten the bolt and replace the cover.

I apologize for the blurry photo.
The bike's outside.
It's 42F and 00:35. =)
 

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Never really wanted to tell this story, but it technically was the first/only modification done to my SCR.

First week of driving it to work I was trying to find a bike/scooter spot to park in a garage when one suddenly appeared next to me. I hit my front brake too hard and popped forward a little on the seat and the bike began to tip to the left. By the time I got my left foot down the bike was already heading for the ground. I tried to stop it with my arms and realized the weight was too much at that point so I tried my best to let it down as slowly as possible as I dismounted and could then with my legs actually lift the bike back upright. Embarrassed I looked around and luckily no one was there to see what had happened. At first inspection I didn't notice any damage to the left side of the bike aside from some light scratches on the ball end of the clutch lever that made contact with the concrete. So later that day after work I go to start riding and once I get out onto the road and shift to 2nd I immediately felt awkward and popped it into neutral instead. I managed to get to the first red light and looked down to realize the shifter had also made contact with the concrete on the fall and had been bent out towards the bike. I panicked a little but assured myself that with my warranty the dealership could fix this, if not doing it myself. I worked it through all the gears it seemed to be operating just fine, and then after a couple rides I actually started to like the new position of it. Before when I would shift I'd have to swing out nearly my entire foot to get under the shifter, sometimes even getting it stuck halfway in, and then even when I would shift, the contact point on my foot was far up past the toe and on the laces. Since it got bent though, I can now keep my heel planted on the foot peg and swing out the front of my foot to get under the shifter, and the point of contact is now directly ontop the center of my big toe.

TLDR: I put my bike down the first week I had it and the shifter got bent out, but I actually enjoy the new position of it.
 

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I adjusted my shifter the second day of ownership. Although I used the method eddie described with the turnbuckle setup. Lol
But I almost did a similar tip over when my pant leg got caught on something as I was going to put my foot down at a traffic light. It wasn't my most graceful maneuver, but I got it free soon enough to prevent the dreaded stop and flop.
 

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Yeah, gotta be careful with catching pant cuffs AND boot laces. Takes just a second to have an embarrassing moment. Yoitsemo: good to hear there was minimal damage and you weren't hurt. Yamaha makes some decent looking low profile engine guards for the Bolt that will fit the SCR950 (part number 1tp-f43b0-v0-00). Another thing on my "must get" list.
 

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Yeah, gotta be careful with catching pant cuffs AND boot laces. Takes just a second to have an embarrassing moment. Yoitsemo: good to hear there was minimal damage and you weren't hurt. Yamaha makes some decent looking low profile engine guards for the Bolt that will fit the SCR950 (part number 1tp-f43b0-v0-00). Another thing on my "must get" list.
Great to know that it fits, coz I have always wanted to get these crash bars, for mounting a light... specially that I commute at night sometimes

The thing is that whenever you type in the search accessories for SCR950 the price is doubled or tripled for some reason !!
 

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I too have almost dropped the SCR950 several times rolling to a stop. All it takes is a moment’s distraction like getting boot laces or jean cuffs tangled in the pegs with those protruding feelers. The bike is heavy and difficult to recover once past a critical lean angle.

At first I thought to relocate the stock pegs out of the way with forward controls. Unfortunately Yamaha foot peg relocation kit 1TP-F14A0-V0 for the Bolt is not a simple bolt-on fit (excuse the pun) due to the unique shape of the SCR’s mounting brackets for brake master cylinder and gear shift.

So now I am tempted to install Yamaha’s Engine Guards 1TP-F43B0-V0 mentioned here. The website shows these fit the Bolt and Bolt R-Spec from 2014 to 2018 but the SCR950 is not included. The main frame and engine is the same so in principle there should be no problem. Has anyone confirmed this?

The engine guards would also serve nicely as highway pegs to ease leg cramps on long rides and Yamaha’s price at $169.99 is not too bad.
 

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The website shows these fit the Bolt and Bolt R-Spec from 2014 to 2018 but the SCR950 is not included. The main frame and engine is the same so in principle there should be no problem. Has anyone confirmed this?
For the same reasons I believe they should fit. I have not installed these on my bike, so cannot say with one hundred percent certainty that no modifications are required...
 

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The engine guards for the SCR by hepco & becker (that are supposed to be guaramteed to fit) are priced for like $245 which is too high

I will see if I can find the bolt engine guards at the close dealer and try them on the bike
That way no need to pay for shipping back if they don't fit... Specially that the online seller has already disclosed that it' only bolt & r spec
 

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The Yamaha engine guards do not fit the Bolt C-Spec according to the Amazon Q&A section, because the foot control layout (side stand, shifter, brake) is positioned differently. Apparently you need to cut a notch in the mounting plate to fit.

I suspect the SCR950 will have a similar problem so you best line the guards up at the dealer to see if some machining is required. Might be a deal breaker :confused:
 

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After the first ride, I adjusted both the brake and clutch levers. I like to rest my feet over the levers when I'm riding, I don't like splaying my feet out to the sides of the pegs. That's dangerous, as your foot will drag before the peg feeler, and the road can rip your foot off the peg violently. Sportbike riders ride with their toes on the pegs, but I've never liked that riding position. I like having the controls directly under my feet and readily accessible. So I adjusted the shifter and the brake pedal down, then adjusted the brake light switch. The shifter was easy, just loosen the bolts and rotate the linkage shaft until it was in a good position. For the brake side I had to remove the entire footpeg bracket, then lube up the rubber dust seal on the master cylinder, and then rotate the shaft.

My adjustments do make it more difficult to get my toe under the shifter with my big boots on, but I like it far better.

Charles.
 

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Never really wanted to tell this story, but it technically was the first/only modification done to my SCR.

First week of driving it to work I was trying to find a bike/scooter spot to park in a garage when one suddenly appeared next to me. I hit my front brake too hard and popped forward a little on the seat and the bike began to tip to the left. By the time I got my left foot down the bike was already heading for the ground. I tried to stop it with my arms and realized the weight was too much at that point so I tried my best to let it down as slowly as possible as I dismounted and could then with my legs actually lift the bike back upright. Embarrassed I looked around and luckily no one was there to see what had happened. At first inspection I didn't notice any damage to the left side of the bike aside from some light scratches on the ball end of the clutch lever that made contact with the concrete. So later that day after work I go to start riding and once I get out onto the road and shift to 2nd I immediately felt awkward and popped it into neutral instead. I managed to get to the first red light and looked down to realize the shifter had also made contact with the concrete on the fall and had been bent out towards the bike. I panicked a little but assured myself that with my warranty the dealership could fix this, if not doing it myself. I worked it through all the gears it seemed to be operating just fine, and then after a couple rides I actually started to like the new position of it. Before when I would shift I'd have to swing out nearly my entire foot to get under the shifter, sometimes even getting it stuck halfway in, and then even when I would shift, the contact point on my foot was far up past the toe and on the laces. Since it got bent though, I can now keep my heel planted on the foot peg and swing out the front of my foot to get under the shifter, and the point of contact is now directly ontop the center of my big toe.

TLDR: I put my bike down the first week I had it and the shifter got bent out, but I actually enjoy the new position of it.


I actually kinda like that. Now I'm debating if I should try to bend mine. :laugh:
 

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Like mine?! (Ahem.....)
Having seen your shift lever adjustments, maybe I could interest you in a matching clutch lever.
 

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Oh man! There's more to this story than I was aware of.
 

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Heh heh......

But did yours do this?!
Ben
Tell me you didn't fish hook the front fascia right off that car with your shift lever?
 

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(snip). I managed to get to the first red light and looked down to realize the shifter had also made contact with the concrete on the fall and had been bent out towards the bike. I panicked a little but assured myself that with my warranty the dealership could fix this, if not doing it myself. (snip)
Warranties don't cover accident damage like this.
A sympathetic dealer might......might be considerate to a new rider and help by offering the broken part at a reduced cost.
Once.

We are fortunate that the SCR's foot controls are steel that can be heated and bent back into shape fairly simply. An aluminum alloy part would just snap 9/10 of the time.
 

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Tell me you didn't fish hook the front fascia right off that car with your shift lever?
Got it in one. Pretty dumb on my part - filtering past a line of standing traffic, but on chevrons (where any officer of the law would have told me I shouldn’t have been), and one of the cars decides to turn right, across my path, into a factory forecourt. If I’d have been a millisecond later, or her earlier, I’d have been over the bonnet (hood), but as it happened - and you guessed - the gear lever hooked the front right off that car. Don’t let anyone tell you the controls on the SCR aren’t tough - like Eddie said - pretty solid steel. Managed to keep control (just) and get it into neutral, before going over to check on the driver (and offer my red-faced apology). Once details had been exchanged, managed to bend it just enough back in to shift (in a rather comedic fashion, it much be said) and limp home. Once there, removed the lever and straightened it in a vice - can’t even tell now. Only mark on the bike is a slight scuff on the front sprocket cover, so that shows how close I was to being taken off. Went for a foot x-ray (guess it was a foot/lever combo that actually mashed the car), and no breaks - but I tell you, that’s the closest I want to come to a ‘proper’ off, thank you. Also not looking forward to my insurance premium this year. :frown2:
Ben
 
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