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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just wanted to start a discussion about properly storing a motorcycle for winter. What brought this up was my brother's motorcycle, he decided to just leave it sitting on its wheels all winder and now they're cracked.

Any suggestions and tips for scr950 winter storage?
 

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If you can store your bike with the tires off the ground, that’s great. Taking the weight off your wheels is the ideal way to avoid flat spots or uneven wear. But, if you don’t have the right setup for that, you’re not out of luck. Fill your tires to the maximum recommended volume, place your ride on its center stand, and remember to rotate the front tire once a week to keep the flat spots away.
There are a ton of tips in regards to winter storage. Some people have different views on different things though lol. Here's a site that I got the above from though.

Motorcycle Storage: 7 Ways to Keep Winter from Trashing Your Ride
 

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Could definitely use that same guide above and substitute your own chemicals and cleaners and what not. The main thing is taking the essentials from these, and applying it. Or just take it somewhere and pay someone else to do it for the winter.
 

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The main thing is to keep those tires off the ground! No matter what tires you slap on the scr950, having it sit all winter on the cold ground could lead to flat spots or in your case, cracked tires. At least lay down some old carpet or plywood so the moisture won't seep in.
 

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Fuel stabilizers definitely get used. Sta-bil fuel stabilizer from the local Canadian Tire suffices. Just make sure you're using the proper ratio.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You're supposed to use one ounce (30mL) of Sta-bil fuel stabilizer for ever 2½ gallons (9.5L) of gasoline. So the scr950 3.4 gal tank would require a bit more than an ounce. Not as much as I was expecting.
 

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A lot of internet lore gets generated around favorite brands but it pays to do some research. Based on my background in chemistry I would rate Yamaha's own Fuel Med Rx as one of the better additives to combat corrosion and gum caused by ethanol plus water in stale gasoline. Many other additives are just isopropanol with doubtful benefits. Your Yamaha dealer should carry Fuel Med Rx. Here's a link:
https://www.shopyamaha.com/product/details/fuel-med-rx
 

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Going with the product straight from Yamaha probably is the best route to go. I know quite a few people that use that Sta-bil stuff and haven't had any issues, but I do feel a bit more reassured buying chemicals from the manufacturer directly
 

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Fuel Med Rx is pretty cheap anyways, may as well go for the manufacturer approved fuel stabilizer for a peace of mind. $5.99 for 16oz of that stuff would last you a few seasons if not more.
 

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If the tank is going to require a bit more than one ounce, that 16oz bottle will definitely last a good amount of time. How long is the shelf life of fuel stabilizer though ?
 

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You can also buy Fuel Med Rx in the smaller 3.2 oz bottle. This is not as economical as the larger size but enough if you only want to use it for motorcycle seasonal storage. I expect the shelf life of the stabilizer is quite a few years in a sealed bottle, just like motor oil.
 

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True.. and I mean you can always use the stabilizer for your other "vehicles" as well. The lawnmower, deere, etc. Always good to have on hand, or perhaps just handing it off to a bud that runs out.
 

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I think there are even liquids that allow you to do a better flush of the engine and i`ve seen online that its what some owners do before preparing their bike every season.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You don't really need to do an engine flush unless you haven't changed the oil in a long time and there's a likelihood of sludge. But you're supposed to change the oil when you winterize the SCR950 so that's a non issue.
 

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An engine flush isn't necessary if you keep up regular maintenance properly. These are also way too new to have any sort of sludge build up or anything.
 

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Just changing the oil when suggested and before storage should be more than enough to prevent sludge buildup. The scr950 is definitely too new to have this problem, so this is more of a precautionary action for the future.
 
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